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knitandbake.com free dog sweater pattern -- finished projects from readersIt’s always such a bright point in my day when someone emails me or posts on KnitandBake’s facebook page a photo of project they’ve made from my patterns! It’s kind of a magical feeling, knowing that I was snuggled on the couch working on a pattern some cold winter night, and then a few weeks or months later, someone in a totally different state or country is making something for their loved ones using my design!

Here are a few photos of finished projects from KnitandBake readers! You can click each photo to go to the pattern it was knit from! (These photos are from Linus’ Easy Dog Sweater and the Easy Striped Cowl).

I’m going to continue posting reader’s photos, so if you’ve made something from KnitAndBake.com, please post a photo of your finished project on facebook.com/knitandbake or email it to me at knitandbakeblog@gmail.com !

Happy knitting!

knitandbake.com free dog sweater pattern -- finished projects from readers

knitandbake.com free dog sweater pattern -- finished projects from readers

knitandbake.com free dog sweater pattern -- finished projects from readers

knitandbake.com free dog sweater pattern -- finished projects from readers

Hi everyone! It’s been awhile since I’ve posted a new pattern — but I’m really excited to be back at it, and just finished a new pattern for you, just in time for the cold weather! I’ve been wanting to make a really snuggly, bright cowl to wear both as a shirt/sweater and as a scarf. So I knit up this super simple piece – and then I had no idea what to call it! I named the pattern “Cowl Sweater Shrug Wrap” but feel free to leave suggestions for what this is actually called, in the comments below!

I also decided to try something brand new — a video tutorial! Check out the tutorial above that I made for this project, in my first ever youtube video! Please subscribe to my youtube channel to keep up-to-date when I add new videos!

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

Supplies:

4 skeins of Berroco Comfort Worsted weight yarn

1 pair of size 9US circular needles

1 darning needle

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

Sizing:

This pattern is meant to be really easy and intuitive to size to yourself — no need for swatching or calculating! The 120 stitches that you cast on will create the height of the cowl, which ended up being roughly 20″ tall for mine. However, the height will end up stretching, and it will vary depending on how snug you make yours. To make the cowl smaller or larger, simply knit a shorter or longer rectangle.

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

Instructions:

1. Cast on 120 stitches onto size 9US circular needles. The piece is not knit in the round, but I like using the circular needles because the piece ends up being fairly large, and I find it easier to keep the large amount of stitches on the circular needles.

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

2. Work back and forth in the brioche stitch. If you’d like video instructions on how to do the brioche stitch, check out the video tutorial I made for this project!

The stitch goes as follows: Bring yarn to the front of your work. Slip the next stitch purl-wise. Knit the next two stitches together. Continue in this pattern until the end of the row, and repeat on all rows.

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

3. Continue working in the brioche stitch until your piece wraps snuggly around your arms. The lines will be going horizontally across your chest, and the seam will be verticle. You’ll want the wrap to be tight enough that it stays up, but not so tight that you can’t breathe! My piece ended up being roughly 20″ tall and about 32″ wide before folding it over (I say “rough” because this fabric is very stretchy, and the measurements are not exact by any means).

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

4. Cast off. To cast off, rather than slipping the first stitch purl-wise, do an actual purl stitch. Then, knit the next two stitches together, and pull the first stitch over the second on the right needle. Again, check out the video tutorial above to see how to cast off.

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

5. Now that you’ve cast off your piece, you’ll have a long rectangle. Fold your work in half, as shown. It may look very tall, but when you put the wrap on your body, it will stretch nicely. Using a darning needle and a long piece of your yarn, seam up the side. I’m sure there are fancier/better ways to seam this, but I’m more of a knitter than sewer! So I just did a quick, simple seam, and then flipped the wrap inside out, so that the seam was inside. If you have a suggestion for a better way to seam this, feel free to leave it in the comments below!

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

You can wear this as a super cozy, warm wrap. Or, you can wear it around your neck as a cowl scarf!

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

Cowl Sweater Shrug - easy, free knitting pattern from Knitandbake.com, using the brioche stitch.

If you end up knitting up this project, please feel free to send along photos of your completed work to knitandbakeblog@gmail.com or post it on the Knit and Bake facebook page, and at some point, I’ll put together a post featuring your work!

cabled fingerless gloves knitting pattern, knit on straight needles / knitandbake.comI just posted my first pattern for sale in the Ravelry store! This pattern is for a set of cabled, fingerless gloves. They are knit on straight needles (rather that on double pointed needles, in the round), which I chose to do because I find it much easier and more fun to knit cables on straight needles!

l bought the yarn at Seaport Yarn in New York City — a gorgeous, shiny yarn called Malabrigo Silky Marino, in Plum Blossom. (I also found it online here, at Jimmy Beans Wool).

There are four sizes in the pattern, small, medium, large, and extra large, but because the gloves are so stretchy, the sizing is very forgiving. These photos are a size small from the pattern. It took two skeins of yarn, although it really took 1 skein and just a bit from the second skein, so you could easily make them longer, or use the extra yarn for another project!

I had a blast making these :) It’s complicated enough that I never got bored, but simple enough that I could have a conversation at the same time!

You can buy the pattern online at Ravelry here!

 

cabled fingerless gloves knitting pattern, knit on straight needles / knitandbake.comknitting cablescabled fingerless gloves knitting pattern, knit on straight needles.cabled fingerless gloves knitting pattern, knit on straight needles / knitandbake.comcabled fingerless gloves knitting pattern, knit on straight needles / knitandbake.com

 

I got the inspiration from a cowl/snood in the men’s section at Zara in New York City. Their cowl was with a finer, silkier yarn, but I made mine with a chunky, super warm grey wool. This pattern is really easy, knit in the round (no seams!) and can be knit up in a couple of nights. The k4, p4 pattern creates a horizontal ribbing or stripes that make it really easy to “scrunch” down when wearing the cowl.

Supplies:

  • 2 skeins, Bernat Roving yarn (I used the color “Flint”, and had half a skein left over)
  • Size 13 circular needles
  • Darning needle, for weaving in the ends

Instructions:

1. Cast on 56 stitches onto your circular, size 13 needle.

2. Join work together, being careful not to twist any stitches. Place stitch marker where you joined the stitches. Work entire piece in the round, following this pattern: knit 4 rows, purl 4 rows.

3. Continue in this pattern until your cowl is roughly 10″ long when bunched up, or about 16-18 inches when stretched out. Mine had 19 “stripes” (19 stripes at 4 rows per stripe = 76 rows total). You can make it shorter or longer, depending on how you’d like to wear it! Finish your last row on a “purl” stripe, and only purl 3 rows, rather than 4. Then, bind off in the purl, and that will be your fourth row. Weave in any ends, and your cowl is ready!

In my “real” life, as a photographer, I usually can’t wear gloves when shooting outside in the winter. So, I recently knit up a pair of fingerless gloves, which are perfect for me. They’re warm, cute, and I still have all the freedom and dexterity I need for shooting!

Diana’s Fingerless “Photographer’s Gloves” Knitting Pattern

Supplies:

  • 2 skeins of Caron Simply Soft yarn, in two different colors (or 1 skein if you knit these in 1 color)
  • Size 7 double pointed needles (4 needles total)
  • Darning needle for weaving in ends
Size:
I made these gloves to fit my hands snugly, which I would guess are a women’s size small.
Abbreviations:
k=knit, p=purl, MC=main color, CC=contrasting color, and k1f&b=knit 1 through the front and back (increase stitch)
Instructions:

1. Cast on 32 stitches with MC (main color) onto one needle, and then move a third of the stitches to the second needle, and a third of the stitches to your third needle.

2. Making sure not to twist any stitches, join your stitches in the round, using the fourth needle. Using MC, work in 1×1 ribbing (knit 1, purl 1) for about 13 rows, or roughly 2 inches.

3. Switch to CC (contrasting yarn), and switch to stockinette stitch (knitting every stitch). For the rest of the pattern (until you get to the top cuff), switch between MC and CC every 2 rows. Continue like this for 22 rows, or 11 stripes. You’ll notice that when you get to the end of every other row, the last stitch from the row before will seem a little lose. Make sure to pull from the yarn you aren’t currently using, to make sure it stays tight.

4. Next, you’ll start increasing for the thumb gusset. After you’ve completed 11 stripes, follow this pattern for the next 10 rows:

  • Row 1: k1, k1f&b, k1, k1f&b, and k until the end of the row
  • Row 2: k all stitches
  • Row 3: k 1, k1f&b, k3, k1f&b, and k until end of the row
  • Row 4: k all stitches
  • Row 5: k1, k1f&b, k5, k1f&b, and k until end of the row
  • Row 6: k all stitches
  • Row 7: k1, k1f&b, k7, k1f&b, and k until end of row
  • Row 8: k all stitches
  • Row 9: k1, k1f&b, k9, k1f&b, and k until end of row
  • Row 10: k all stitches
At this point, you should have 42 stitches in total.

5. On the next row, k1, and then using a darning needle, put the next 12 stitches onto a piece of scrap yarn and tie the yarn to make sure the stitches don’t fall off. You’ll come back to these later to finish the thumb. k the rest of the stitches of that row, and continue in the stockinette stitch and stripes for 5 more stripes, or 10 more rows.

6. After you’ve knit 5 more stripes (10 more rows), ending on a CC stripe, switch back to your MC and begin ribbing again for the top cuff (k1, p1). Continue in ribbing for 7 rows, and then bind off loosely.

7. Your main section of the glove is complete. Now, using your needles, pick up the stitches from the thumb that are on scrap yarn. Separate them over the three needles, and pick up one stitch from the inside part of the thumb. You should have 13 stitches total. Continue in the stockinette stitch, switching colors every 2 rows, for as long as you’d like your thumb to be (I did 2 stripes), making sure to end on a CC stripe. Switch back to MC and work in 1×1 ribbing (k1, p1), for 4 rows. Bind off loosely. Your glove is finished! Make 2 if you’d like a full pair, or stick with one if you’d like to wear it Michael Jackson-style :)

This is my free knitting pattern for a super simple, easy to knit seed stitch cowl. It uses one skein of yarn, and can be knitted up in one night, making it a perfect and affordable last-minute present! It’s knit in the round, so there’s no seaming at the end, and it’s really warm and cozy.

Supplies:

  • 1 skein, Bernat Roving yarn, in a light grey
  • Size 13 circular needles (hat sized length)
  • Darning needles, for weaving in ends

Instructions:

1. Cast on 49 stitches onto your size 13 circular needles. If you’d like to make the cowl wider or smaller, just make sure to cast on an odd number of stitches, because when working the seed stitch in the round, it will create a funny ridge if you use an even number of stitches.

2. Join the work together in the round, making sure not to twist any stitches. Work entire piece in the seed stitch. k1, p1, all the way across the row. When you get to the next row, continue this, and you’ll be knitting all of your purl stitches, and purling all of your knit stitches. This gives it the textured look of the seed stitch. [ Note: I've always confused the moss stitch and the seed stitch. I'm fairly sure this is the seed stitch, but please correct me if I'm wrong! ]

3. Continue working the seed stitch until you are almost out of yarn, making sure you’ve left enough yarn to bind off. Bind off loosely — this is important, because you don’t want the top of the cowl to be tight. Weave in your ends, and your cowl is complete!

 

Here’s my pattern for this simple, beautiful, and quick garter stitch cowl, knitted in the round. I love this cowl scarf because it’s super soft, cozy, and warm, and because it’s knit on round needles in one piece, there’s no need to sew up any seams. You could knit this up in a day or two!

Supplies:

  • 1 skein of Bernat Roving yarn in a light turquoise
  • Size 13 circular needles
  • Darning needle for weaving in tails

Instructions:

1. Cast on 56 stitches on your circular, size 13 needles.

2. Knit entire first row. When you’ve finished, join your work, making sure not to twist any stitches. After you’ve joined the piece, purl the next row. This is different than knitting the garter stitch on straight needles (where you would knit every stitch of both rows). To achieve the garter stitch when knitting in the round, knit every stitch of the first row, and purl every stitch of the second row. Repeat these two rows until your piece is finished.

If you need help remembering when to switch from knit to purl, and visa versa, add a stitch marker where it switches. If you don’t have an actual stitch marker, you can use a piece of yarn, or anything that will go around the needle.

3. Continue until you are almost out of yarn, leaving enough to bind off. Bind off your last row, and weave in any ends. Your cowl is complete!

 

knitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.

I had the inspiration for this baby hoodie from an adorable little bonnet I saw at my friend Helen’s house. It was so cute, and looked fairly simple, so I decided to attempt to come up with a similar pattern for my niece Kyla’s 1st birthday present. It’s super simple to knit, really adorable, and because it ties at the bottom, it stays on her head for far longer than a regular hat! Plus, it’s really quick – you could probably knit this up in a night or two. I absolutely love working with this yarn ( Lion Brand Yarn’s Baby’s First) – it’s super thick, soft, and creates a really nice finished piece.

knitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.

Supplies:

  • 1 skein, Lion Brand Yarn’s Baby’s First in yellow
  • Size 10 knitting needles (I used a long circular needle)
  • Darning needle
Sizing
This hoodie fit my 1 year old niece perfectly. It ended up being about 8 inches tall, and 7.5 inches wide. The gauge was about 3.5 stitches per inch, on a size 10 needle.

Lion Brand Yarn Baby's First

Instructions:

1. Cast on 62 stitches

casting on 62 stitches on size 10 needles

2. Work in ribbing (k2, p2) for about 7 rows, or until ribbing is your desired length.

work in ribbing (k2 p2) for about 7 rows

3. For the rest of the piece, repeat these two rows (or switch the order, depending on what row you finished your ribbing. Make sure the first 4 and last 4 stitches are being knit/purled the same as in the ribbing):

  • Row 1: p2, k2. p until there are 4 stitches left. k2, p2
  • Row 2: k2, p2. k until there are 4 stitches left. p2, k2

knitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.knitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.

4. Bind off, leaving a very long tail, which you will use to seam the back edge of the hoodie.

knitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.

5. Fold completed piece in half, with the inside facing out. Using a darning needle and your leftover tail yarn, seam up the back edge of the hoodie.

folding piece in half, inside out, and seaming the edge

Make sure to go through the first two “v’s” on both edges, so you have a nice, clean seam when you flip the hoodie back the right side out.

seaming the two sidesthe first part of the hoodie

6. Make the hoodie pull ties. Cast on 4 stitches onto your same size 10 needle. For every row: k1, p1, k1, p1. Continue until your pull ties have reached your desired length. Bind off, leaving plenty of tail yarn to sew the ties onto the hoodie. Make 2 of these.

for hoodie pull ties, cast on 4 stitchesk1, p1, k1, p1 every row until the ties are your desired lengthknitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.

7. Using your darning needle and the tail yarn of the pull ties, sew the two ties onto the main piece of the hoodie.

sewing the pull ties to the hoodieknitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.knitandbake.com - Kyla's hoodie. Easy to knit baby hat / bonnet.

This has to be one of the easiest, most basic patterns for knitting a cowl or endless scarf! Such a great project for beginner’s. If you can cast on, do the knit stitch, bind off, and sew, you’ll be all set! I think this would be a perfect first project for someone who’s just learning how to knit. Or, it’s a great “mindless” knitting project for a more advanced knitter, who wants something easy to keep their hands busy while watching a movie!

SUPPLIES:

  • 2 balls of Bernat Mosaic Yarn (100g/3.5 oz) in the color “Medusa” (I picked it up at A.C. Moore while it was on sale for $2.99/ball!)
  • Size 9 knitting needles
  • Darning needle

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Cast on 40 stitches
2. Work back and forth in the garter stitch (knit every single stitch of every row!) until you run out of yarn. The only tricky part about this cowl (if you’re using the Moasic yarn) is that you’ll want to start your new skein of yarn on the same color as you ended the last skein. So, if you end on a light pink part of the yarn, make sure to start on the same color of the second skein when switching.
3. Continue in garter stitch with your second skein of yarn, either until you run out of yarn or until the piece measures around 53 inches long. You’ll be stitching the ends together, so make sure you end on a similar color as you started the cowl with.
4. Bind off, and sew the two ends together, forming a loop. Weave in ends, and your cowl is complete! 
I made this cowl for my Mom, but since she’s a little camera-shy, I had to put the cowl on for the photos, so you can see how it looks when wrapped twice around the neck. xo!

Lately, our dog Linus has been shivering in this cold New York City weather, so I decided to knit my little buddy a sweater! Here’s the pattern I came up with, using TalkingTails as a general starting point. It’s a really easy pattern — if you can knit, purl, and knit two together, you’ll have no problem!

Supplies:

  • One skein of Caron Simply Soft navy blue (You’ll only use a very small amount of the skein, so you can save the leftovers for other projects!)
  • One skein of Caron Simply Soft light blue (Again, you’ll be using a very small amount)
  • Size 6US needles
  • Size 7US needles
  • Darning needle
  • An adorable dog who needs a sweater!

[ Note: This sweater fit my Maltese dog, who is 7.4 pounds. ]

Instructions:

1. Cast on 46 stitches onto your size 6US needle.

2. Work ribbing for 8 rows in the navy blue (knit 2, purl 2, and reverse on opposite rows).

3. After 8 rows, switch the work over to the larger size, 7US needles.

4. Switch to the light blue color. Work garter stitch for the first and last 4 stiches. For the middle of the rows, use stockinette stitch (knit all stitches on one row, purl all stitches on the next row, and keep repeating).

[ To write it out explicitly:

Row A: k46

Row B: k4, p38, k4 ]

5. Continue in this pattern for 8 rows. Then switch back to navy blue and continue in the same pattern for 8 more rows. Continue your stripes like this until there are 3 navy blue stripes, and 3 light blue stripes.

6. After you have 6 complete stripes, switch your work back to the smaller 6US needles. Again, work in ribbing (k2, p2) for 8 rows. Bind off.

7. Next, you’ll start knitting the underbelly of the sweater. Cast on 18 stitches in the navy blue yarn on your larger size 7US needles. Work garter stitch for 3 rows, then work in stockinette stitch for the next 5 rows, making sure to work garter stitch in the first and last two stitches of each row, creating a garter stitch border.

8. You’ll need to decrease this section of the sweater. In the next stripe, using the light blue yarn, work in the same pattern as before (garter stitch in first and last two stitches, with stockinette in between). When you get to the 5th row, knit together the first two stitches, and knit together the last two stitches of the row. Complete the stripe as normal with 3 more rows. Each stripe should be 8 rows tall.

Repeat this with the next two rows (decreasing in the 5th of 8 rows), with a total of 3 decreases.

When you have 2 rows of navy blue and 2 rows of light blue, switch work back to the smaller size 6US needle, and finish off the piece with 8 rows of ribbing (k2, p2).

9. Using a darning needle, sew the underbelly part of the sweater to the top, leaving a gap where the pup’s arms will go. In this sweater, you’ll sew together the first two stripes, then leave a gap for the next two stripes, and then sew the last stripe.

10. Tuck in any loose ends, and voila — your puppy sweater is ready!